Institute of Southern Jewish Life Community Engagement Department ASK (Act, Share, Keep) Newsletter

Title
Institute of Southern Jewish Life Community Engagement Department ASK (Act, Share, Keep) Newsletter
Description
This issue of the Institute of Southern Jewish Life ASK (Act, Share, Keep) Newsletter shares resources to help others during the COVID-19 pandemic. This monthly email newsletter goes to congregations and individuals across the South who participate in this Jewish social justice education program.
Date Created
March 31, 2020
Community
Institute of Souther Jewish Life
Genre
Newsletter
Language
English
Contributor
Rachel Glazer
Subject
Southern
Jewish
Jewish social justice
extracted text
Spring 2020: How can we help?
As the Director of Community Engagement, one of the things I am
most proud of is the department's creation of the ASK program. We
have worked hard to create modules that bring the ISJL's passion
for interactive learning for any learner at any level to Jewish social
justice. I have loved seeing how many communities have allowed us
to work with them in unique ways. As I leave the ISJL, I could not be
happier that my successor, Rachel Glazer, shares this passion and
will continue to think of fun, meaningful ways for all of us to Act,
Share, and Keep our Jewish values.
"I ask not for a lighter burden, but for
broader shoulders." As our worlds shrink
to impromptu home offices, they are
also broadening exponentially with a
myriad of Zoom sessions, live streamed
concerts, and email chains from friends
checking in. The ISJL Community
Engagement Department will continue to provide services as
we can, whether through virtual engagement with our ASK
modules or a quick check-in over the phone. Please let us
know how we can be a resource and support for you.
Rachel Glazer
Community Engagement Program Manager

How to be a Helper
In our Jewish Resilience module, we spend time with the words of Fred
Rogers: "Look for the helpers." You might be wondering how you can be a
helper right now without putting yourself or others at risk. We've rounded
up resources for helping virtually, from home, and down the road.
You can find these resources and many more on our website's "Connection
in the time of Coronavirus" page.

Helping Virtually

We are lucky to live in an era of electronic
interconnection. Now is a great time to sharpen
our virtual learning, teaching, and sharing skills.
Share your talents! If you are a tutor, artist, musician,
or anyone with some special knowledge that others might benefit from, let
people know what they can reach out to you about. Learn how to teach over
Zoom here.
If you are in a financially stable situation, donate money to those who are
struggling with the loss of wages. You can send money directly to service
workers via apps like Venmo or CashApp, or through GoFundMe campaigns.
Contribute to your local food bank or distribution service. Start by
donating money rather than food items-- this gives the food bank more
flexibility.

Helping at Home
Being physically separated does not mean that we
must be emotionally distant from our community.
Here are a few ways you can support others while
social distancing.
Pick up the phone. Give friends and family a call to let them know you're
thinking of them.
Reach out to at-risk neighbors and healthcare workers. Bring in their mail,
water their garden, or drop off groceries at their door. Simple neighborly
tasks can make their lives a little easier.
Write cards to folks in retirement homes who cannot have visitors right now.
This is a great way for kids to use their art skills to make someone smile. You
can take a picture or scan the card to send it to the facility electronically.
Donate blood if you are able. Check in with your local blood bank to see if
they are setting up mobile banks in your area.
Amplify messages of other helpers. Use your voice to lift up the creative
ways many folks have found to help.

Helping Down the Road
Even as we are in the thick of this trying time, we
know that this too shall pass. Here are some actions
you can take now to make our world heal a little
faster.
Take care of your mental and emotional well-being. In her article, "Getting
Emotionally Organized in a Crisis," Pippi Kessler encourages taking note of
what we can take action of now as well as what cracks we see in current
systems. Once we are through the worst of it, those are the causes for which
we can work to enact change.
Support local businesses and restaurants by purchasing gift cards to use
later. You're not going to want to cook for a long time after this!

Strategize your advocacy. The NAACP put out an excellent document
compiling short- and long-term actions that we can take on a variety of
equity and civil rights concerns.

Let us know how we can help.
If you're seeking digital Jewish social justice
education and connection resources, reach
out to the ISJL Community Engagement
Department. We would love to open up lines
of dialogue in your community and contribute
to your helping and your healing.
Click here to bring ASK to your
community.

About ASK: Act, Share, Keep
ASK (Act, Share, Keep) is a diverse array of 90-minute
programs for all ages that bring together innovative activities
and discussions focused on the intersection of social justice
and Judaism in the South.
Learn more about the ASK modules.
For more information contact us at 601.362.6357 or engagement@isjl.org.
THIS IS ISJL: www.isjl.org
Call Us: 601-362-6357
We're social! Like us, follow us, and read our blog!
Spring 2020: How can we help?
As the Director of Community Engagement, one of the things I am
most proud of is the department's creation of the ASK program. We
have worked hard to create modules that bring the ISJL's passion
for interactive learning for any learner at any level to Jewish social
justice. I have loved seeing how many communities have allowed us
to work with them in unique ways. As I leave the ISJL, I could not be
happier that my successor, Rachel Glazer, shares this passion and
will continue to think of fun, meaningful ways for all of us to Act,
Share, and Keep our Jewish values.
"I ask not for a lighter burden, but for
broader shoulders." As our worlds shrink
to impromptu home offices, they are
also broadening exponentially with a
myriad of Zoom sessions, live streamed
concerts, and email chains from friends
checking in. The ISJL Community
Engagement Department will continue to provide services as
we can, whether through virtual engagement with our ASK
modules or a quick check-in over the phone. Please let us
know how we can be a resource and support for you.
Rachel Glazer
Community Engagement Program Manager

How to be a Helper
In our Jewish Resilience module, we spend time with the words of Fred
Rogers: "Look for the helpers." You might be wondering how you can be a
helper right now without putting yourself or others at risk. We've rounded
up resources for helping virtually, from home, and down the road.
You can find these resources and many more on our website's "Connection
in the time of Coronavirus" page.

Helping Virtually

We are lucky to live in an era of electronic
interconnection. Now is a great time to sharpen
our virtual learning, teaching, and sharing skills.
Share your talents! If you are a tutor, artist, musician,
or anyone with some special knowledge that others might benefit from, let
people know what they can reach out to you about. Learn how to teach over
Zoom here.
If you are in a financially stable situation, donate money to those who are
struggling with the loss of wages. You can send money directly to service
workers via apps like Venmo or CashApp, or through GoFundMe campaigns.
Contribute to your local food bank or distribution service. Start by
donating money rather than food items-- this gives the food bank more
flexibility.

Helping at Home
Being physically separated does not mean that we
must be emotionally distant from our community.
Here are a few ways you can support others while
social distancing.
Pick up the phone. Give friends and family a call to let them know you're
thinking of them.
Reach out to at-risk neighbors and healthcare workers. Bring in their mail,
water their garden, or drop off groceries at their door. Simple neighborly
tasks can make their lives a little easier.
Write cards to folks in retirement homes who cannot have visitors right now.
This is a great way for kids to use their art skills to make someone smile. You
can take a picture or scan the card to send it to the facility electronically.
Donate blood if you are able. Check in with your local blood bank to see if
they are setting up mobile banks in your area.
Amplify messages of other helpers. Use your voice to lift up the creative
ways many folks have found to help.

Helping Down the Road
Even as we are in the thick of this trying time, we
know that this too shall pass. Here are some actions
you can take now to make our world heal a little
faster.
Take care of your mental and emotional well-being. In her article, "Getting
Emotionally Organized in a Crisis," Pippi Kessler encourages taking note of
what we can take action of now as well as what cracks we see in current
systems. Once we are through the worst of it, those are the causes for which
we can work to enact change.
Support local businesses and restaurants by purchasing gift cards to use
later. You're not going to want to cook for a long time after this!

Strategize your advocacy. The NAACP put out an excellent document
compiling short- and long-term actions that we can take on a variety of
equity and civil rights concerns.

Let us know how we can help.
If you're seeking digital Jewish social justice
education and connection resources, reach
out to the ISJL Community Engagement
Department. We would love to open up lines
of dialogue in your community and contribute
to your helping and your healing.
Click here to bring ASK to your
community.

About ASK: Act, Share, Keep
ASK (Act, Share, Keep) is a diverse array of 90-minute
programs for all ages that bring together innovative activities
and discussions focused on the intersection of social justice
and Judaism in the South.
Learn more about the ASK modules.
For more information contact us at 601.362.6357 or engagement@isjl.org.
THIS IS ISJL: www.isjl.org
Call Us: 601-362-6357
We're social! Like us, follow us, and read our blog!